Interview with Sonny Rollins, Pt. 5

Give me the five ! Thx again, Larry !

Let's Cool One

IMG_7994This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Pt. 1 of this interview is here, followed by Pt. 2, Pt. 3 and Pt. 4.

 

Appelbaum:  You did an interview with Arthur Taylor–very interesting interview–that

was published in his book “Notes and Tones.”  And in the interview, you say, “I don’t have

the greatest opinion of myself.  I recognize a lot of my faults.”  And I guess, first, I need

to, I’m obligated to ask: What do you think those faults are?

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Interview with Sonny Rollins, Pt. 4

Part 4 of this continuing story …..

Thx a lot, Larry !

Let's Cool One

IMG_8050This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Pt. 1 of this interview is here, followed by Pt. 2 and Pt. 3

 

 

Appelbaum:  Let’s jump ahead a little bit to your first recording session.

Rollins:  Okay.

Appelbaum:  I assume it was with the vocalist…

Rollins:  Babs Gonzales.

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Interview with Sonny Rollins, Pt. 3

well, after a reblog of Pt 1&2 , i simply think i have to be fair and go for another reblog. Even without pre-reading this time … i am too curious myself !

Let's Cool One

IMG_8065This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Pt 1 of this interview is here. Pt. 2 is here.

 

Appelbaum:  Let’s continue.  When you were at a certain crossroads, you were playing the

horn, you loved this music so much, you knew you’re going to dedicate your life to it, but

in terms of style, many people of your generation–horn players–went either

towards Coleman Hawkins or towards Lester Young.  And I wonder if you ever felt you

had to make a choice, and if so, how did…

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part two of the interview

Let's Cool One

IMG_7997

This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Part 1 of this interview is here: http://larryappelbaum.wordpress.com/2013/02/23/interview-with-sonny-rollins-pt-1/.

Pt. 2

Appelbaum:  I meant to ask…how did you acquire the nickname “Sonny?”

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Another Colossus , certainly for the Saxophone ….

A “primitive” way of talking, what also makes his music great ….

Let's Cool One

with Sonny RollinsThis interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes.

 

 

Part 1:

Appelbaum:  Let me begin by just asking some basics to establish some context.

Tell us first of all the date you were born and your full name at birth.

Rollins:  Oh, I was afraid you were going to ask me that.  Ok, my full name at birth was

Walter Theodore Rollins, and I was born September 7, Sunday morning, 1930 in Harlem,

America on 137th Street between Lenox and 7th Avenues.  There was a midwife

that delivered me, and…

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music (1 of 3) jazz

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Well to get a good taste for reblogging, I maybe better also reblog this one to add another good taste of music to my blog :-) Thx Gavin !

Noir

jazz is one of my fave music(s).
i like all kinds of jazz from modern to
jelly roll morton. I have a massive collection. piano jazz is my fave.
it’s probably blasphemous to say, but I’m very fond of Keith Jarrett.
i have most of his stuff, but not all (there is so much)

this concert is the bomb.

ken burns did a fab doco to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz_(TV_series)

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Miles Davis in cool Black and White

Video

Miles Ahead session in Studio 61 in New York City. The show was broadcast on July 21, 1960.

The Miles Davis Quintet

  • 00:00 to 10:40 – So What (composed by Miles Davis from the album Kind Of Blue)

Miles Davis with the Gil Evans Orchestra

  • 10:41 tp 14:04 – The Duke (composed by Dave Brubeck from the album Miles Ahead)
  • 14:05 to 19:57 – Blues For Pablo (composed by Gil Evans from the album Miles Ahead)
  • 19:58 to 24:21 – New Rhumba (composed by Ahmad Jamal from the album Miles Ahead)

Look here for all session details. Of course it’s great (for me as a jazz lover) to see these jazz Master(s) at work. Besides Miles Davis himself we also see that other giant , John Coltrane. Personally i also enjoy to see Gil Evans, who had such an important influence on Miles Davis. But what makes this video also very interesting for me is its registration in b&w. Such cool light and shadows , great portraits from marvelous angles , fine focus. I see many wonderfully composed shots which are worthwhile to be studied with a photographic eye !