Laszlo Bilki | urbanphotomag

… it was inevitable that I loved photography from a very young age.

(…)

As far as my photographic style goes, I am yet to settle on a genre, but I love the soft light of night, and making something beautiful out of something that is not. The more I travel down this path, the less “generic beauty” appeals to me. Occasionally I still feed my soul with a beautiful vista, or the splashing of waves, but generally, give me a dirty alley or a minimalist urban scene any day. “

via Laszlo Bilki | urbanphotomag.

Which evoked my words ….

well beauty is what is seen as beauty; it’s just an agreement with one’s culture, education or with one’s own findings …. What’s important and interesting for me in photography (and art in general) is the way one goes from one pic to another, how one trains one’s eye and perception in mind. The learning steps ….

I enjoy the way you make use of space in these examples. I agree with Ragnar about “Chep” , although i recognize a bit of my eye in “Ikea Colour 2″. Photography has made me love the combi’s of grey and color.

Interview with Sonny Rollins, Pt. 5

Give me the five ! Thx again, Larry !

Let's Cool One

IMG_7994This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Pt. 1 of this interview is here, followed by Pt. 2, Pt. 3 and Pt. 4.

 

Appelbaum:  You did an interview with Arthur Taylor–very interesting interview–that

was published in his book “Notes and Tones.”  And in the interview, you say, “I don’t have

the greatest opinion of myself.  I recognize a lot of my faults.”  And I guess, first, I need

to, I’m obligated to ask: What do you think those faults are?

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Interview with Sonny Rollins, Pt. 4

Part 4 of this continuing story …..

Thx a lot, Larry !

Let's Cool One

IMG_8050This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Pt. 1 of this interview is here, followed by Pt. 2 and Pt. 3

 

 

Appelbaum:  Let’s jump ahead a little bit to your first recording session.

Rollins:  Okay.

Appelbaum:  I assume it was with the vocalist…

Rollins:  Babs Gonzales.

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A Thousand Words

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Image

… On many occasions, after receiving an email that seemed to be aflame, I have walked over to the persons office (…) to find out what they were really saying.In many cases what appeared to be a problem turned out to be poor communications in written form. How we use words can be very powerful. I have concluded that nothing in life can replace the face-to-face discussion to truly convey one’s thoughts and feelings.

Reblogged from : A Thousand Words | Redneck Garage.

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my reply at the original post:

of course in communication and in understanding eachother a face to face contact can be irreplaceable, especially in business-like matters i think.
I am not so sure that this is also true for a discussion, when getting a deeper insight. is at stake. For me reading and especially writing is the better speed to be able to follow my own thoughts and to deepen them.
Face to face contact can also be very disturbing. Social interaction is not always to the point ; both partners can be unequally prepared for a fair debate; being proved right is often more important than getting a clarified perception; and without this “struggle” having a pleasant time together can be the more important thing.
So i think it’s not one side or another; both ways can have their advantages, depending on the context and the subject.

Imagination « Cristian Mihai

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imagination

“Imagination is the voice of daring.
If there is anything
Godlike about God
it is that.
He dared to imagine everything.”

Henry Miller

Maybe that’s the most  quality an artist should have:
the ability to see more
than what others can’t see,
to see all the billion things hidden in plain sight,
to see what others are too busy to see.

Cristian Mihai

via Imagination « Cristian Mihai.

Beauty will save the world

beauty

Dostoyevsky once said that beauty will save the world. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn kind of agreed with him in his 1970 Nobel Lecture. (that’s just an excerpt but it’s so worth reading.)Beauty will save the world.But what exactly is beauty? How can you define it?I believe beauty is not just an abstract notion, but an experience. Impossible to define, it can just be felt.What I find to be truly fascinating about “beauty,” and not just in the world of arts, but in our day to day lives, is that it doesn’t necessarily provide answers or raise questions. When we say about a painting being beautiful, or a person, a flower, a house, a city, a monument, we talk about something we feel. It’s irrational, illogical, and, quite frankly, I believe that our capacity to feel or experience beauty is the very foundation of your humanity; the most primordial aspect of what it means to be human.I know a lot of artists who say they make art because they want to create something beautiful. They feel the urge to create beauty, to be able to project it on a canvas when there was nothing, to put some words together, to give a rock a different shape, and so on.Now for the big question: how can beauty actually save the world?Solzhenitsyn tried to answer this question in his lecture, and in a way, I agree with him, but I also believe there’s also a much more simpler answer: beauty brings the best in us, because experiencing it is never meaningless.Beauty itself does not provide answers, or raise questions, it’s not a call for action, it’s not a plea. It just is. It can last forever, or just a few minutes, like a beautiful song. Or a sunset. And not only do we derive pleasure, but we also construct meaning from the experience.Based on our own ideals and beliefs and set of skills, we absorb beauty and we want to do something with it. It’s rarely a passive experience. We see a beautiful painting, and we may feel the urge to make something just as beautiful. Or simply tell everyone we know about it. Or photograph it. Or just cry.For whatever reason (or for no reason at all) beauty fills our minds and souls with emotions and thoughts. And in that moment of simple contemplation, we feel as if all of life’s questions have been answered. Pointless worries and petty frustrations are discarded. Time seems to stop, and all that’s greedy and dark and vile about our humanity evaporates.And in that moment, no matter how long it lasts, we catch a glimpse of our own greatness.

via Beauty will save the world.

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my reply at the original post:

First of all, thx for your visit. Very much appreciated …. a beautiful thing :)

I do agree with your title and well in a certan way. Although in some sentences you do speak about our experiences and you do give some place to our mind, in the end i think the used definition of Beauty is a common one, but a resticted one. I think Beauty is a positive sensation what we lend to a piece of art, of nature, of another human being etc.

If it was an internal characteristic of sth/someone it needn’t change in time and place. But to appreciate a work (to speak about art) as a Beauty we have to learn to see, to experience it in a certain way. The work of art remains the same, but in the course of time our appreciation can change. So we play a much more active role in the thing that we call Beauty as often is suggested by essays about this subject. Of course there has to be some qualities in the subject itself to evoke our appreciation, but …. as said …. that’s surely not a guarantee that we will lend our esteem.

Back to the title. Yes when we will see more Beauty in our world, we will surely treat it with more respect and so the world will become a safer place and will be saved from our destructions !

ps i maybe would use some other entries, but i think you’ve written a great thoughtful , evocative and inspiring article. I don’t mean to break it down. On the contrary ! Thx a lot !

Interview with Sonny Rollins, Pt. 3

well, after a reblog of Pt 1&2 , i simply think i have to be fair and go for another reblog. Even without pre-reading this time … i am too curious myself !

Let's Cool One

IMG_8065This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Pt 1 of this interview is here. Pt. 2 is here.

 

Appelbaum:  Let’s continue.  When you were at a certain crossroads, you were playing the

horn, you loved this music so much, you knew you’re going to dedicate your life to it, but

in terms of style, many people of your generation–horn players–went either

towards Coleman Hawkins or towards Lester Young.  And I wonder if you ever felt you

had to make a choice, and if so, how did…

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Very Great !

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very damned true ! What about the word “great” :)

Share Your Articles

Never use the word, ‘very.’ It is the weakest word in the English language; doesn’t mean anything. If you feel the urge of ‘verywriting tips‘ coming on, just write the word, ‘damn,’ in the place of ‘very.’ The editor will strike out the word, ‘damn,’ and you will have a good sentence.

 By

William Allen White

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part two of the interview

Let's Cool One

IMG_7997

This interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes. Part 1 of this interview is here: http://larryappelbaum.wordpress.com/2013/02/23/interview-with-sonny-rollins-pt-1/.

Pt. 2

Appelbaum:  I meant to ask…how did you acquire the nickname “Sonny?”

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Another Colossus , certainly for the Saxophone ….

A “primitive” way of talking, what also makes his music great ….

Let's Cool One

with Sonny RollinsThis interview with Sonny Rollins was commissioned as an NEA Jazz Masters oral history in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s Jazz Oral History Program, recorded on Feb. 28, 2011 at the Willard Hotel in Washington DC. Rollins, who was 80 years old at the time, seemed to enjoy the questions and the flow of the conversation, which stretched to nearly 3 hours, pausing only to change tapes.

 

 

Part 1:

Appelbaum:  Let me begin by just asking some basics to establish some context.

Tell us first of all the date you were born and your full name at birth.

Rollins:  Oh, I was afraid you were going to ask me that.  Ok, my full name at birth was

Walter Theodore Rollins, and I was born September 7, Sunday morning, 1930 in Harlem,

America on 137th Street between Lenox and 7th Avenues.  There was a midwife

that delivered me, and…

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music (1 of 3) jazz

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Well to get a good taste for reblogging, I maybe better also reblog this one to add another good taste of music to my blog :-) Thx Gavin !

Noir

jazz is one of my fave music(s).
i like all kinds of jazz from modern to
jelly roll morton. I have a massive collection. piano jazz is my fave.
it’s probably blasphemous to say, but I’m very fond of Keith Jarrett.
i have most of his stuff, but not all (there is so much)

this concert is the bomb.

ken burns did a fab doco to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz_(TV_series)

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